Cliffy B comes out in support of an always-online gaming future

Cliffy B

By on April 15, 2013 at 4:06 pm

Gears of War creator and Epic Games alumni Cliff Bleszinski has come out in support of always-online gaming software and hardware. In a new blog post, Bleszinski addresses the controversy around (former) Microsoft employee Adam Orth, who very famously told the internet to “deal with it” over their problems with always-online DRM.

“My gut is telling me that an always online future is probably coming. It’s coming fast, and possibly to the majority of the devices you enjoy,” said Bleszinski. “Remember when Microsoft made the decision to only allow broadband on Xbox Live? It was a bold move back then; broadband penetration wasn’t anywhere near what it is now. And yet the march of progress continued.”

“Sooner or later our government, or Google, or any number of providers are going to get their shit together and we’ll have universally fast internet for the majority of the first world.”

Bleszinski claimed that “there’s a whole new generation of kids who are growing up always online who won’t really give a shit. And all that anger, all of that vitrol, all of that lynch mobbing that the internet seems to love to do lately will be for naught and forgotten.”

“My wife and I were discussing these issues this afternoon and she mentioned the example of ‘Hey what if I’m a gamer who wants to go to a cabin in the woods for a week and I don’t have online access there?’ My response was ‘Unplugging entirely sometimes isn’t always a bad thing’. And that’s the edge case… the week-long vacation to the cabin is only 30 hours of not playing a game or a device that’s built for much more.”

“Technology doesn’t advance by worrying about the edge case.”

Source: Clifford Unchained

23 comments (Leave your own)
kinistoniscool

online future NOOOOOO!!!

 

This upsets me a little. He says that modern kids aren’t going to be bothered about it at all because they are growing up on this stuff. That doesn’t make it ok.
Back twenty years and we were worried about other people knowing where we were. The government watching which books we borrowed and trying to keep the smart card down so they companies couldn’t see the things we bought daily.
Kids today will sign in to facebook and announce where they are and what they are buying. And Paris Hilton and Kim Kahozitz would not have been a thing when I was going up as a kid.

The point that I’m trying to make is that we have to protect kids from there own future.

 

The thing is, “always on” is not an irreversible move, so these kinds of pronouncements are fairly stupid.

People will always be free to make hardware and software which respects consumers privacy/wishes. So there will always be PCs, and there will always be software released for PC which allows you to stay offline if you want to.

Put differently, in most cases there is no logical reason why software should not work in an offline mode, and so that will continue to be a feature of some software.

 

he’s an idiot using his stature to push what he wants onto the community. tard

 

I’m with him.

 

I’d be with him if more of the world actually had a stable internet connection.

 

“My wife and I were discussing these issues this afternoon and she mentioned the example of ‘Hey what if I’m a gamer who wants to go to a cabin in the woods for a week and I don’t have online access there?’ My response was ‘Unplugging entirely sometimes isn’t always a bad thing’. And that’s the edge case… the week-long vacation to the cabin is only 30 hours of not playing a game or a device that’s built for much more.”

This is such a b.s. statement by him.

His argument is, essentially, that for no reason whatsoever we should make life harder for people who want to use a product in a particular way.

This is the same ‘logic’ which means that as someone who refuses to buy into the Apple ecosystem, I can’t buy Game of Thrones digitally in Australia.

Basically these companies have the attitude of “our way or the highway”, but unfortunately for them, the “highway” is readily available and superior to their stupid approach in almost every way. No wonder the industry is floundering if this is its attitude.

A good company works out what people want and then gives it to them. It doesn’t decide that people don’t want something but will tolerate it, then force it upon them.

 

Anyone else find a lot of these kinds of arguments fall to very specific, supporting circumstances?

Always online is all well and good if you can guarantee fast internet with 100% up time. These are probably likely conditions over in America, or whatever area these guys are basing their claims on, but as is argued often, you don’t have those guarantees in Australia, much less other less technologically advanced countries.

The same argument was put forward with the NBN ordeal, where “25mb/s” should be enough, which for a couple of people, sure it would, but what happens when you have 5 household members streaming HD video, downloading off iTunes, or whatever else; is 25mb/s still enough then?

Would be nice if they took a broader look when making these claims, but then I guess they wouldn’t be able to shove their claims down people’s throats so easily.

 

“It’s not my internet dropping out I’m worrying about, it’s the servers at your end”
~Total Biscuit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inPLO2J9U50&list=UUy1Ms_5qBTawC-k7PVjHXKQ&index=5

These guys keep making excuses about “the world’s universally fast internet” or “you need to upgrade and keep up with technology”…
One only has to look at Diablo 3, Sim City, and the plethora of times Uplay went down back when they required an always on connection, to see that this isn’t always an issue of us needing to be always connected or keeping up with the Jones’s, hell I’m online with steam running 24/7 anyway; and I’ve connected through offline mode the handful of times my net went down.

Rather, It becomes an issue when I can’t connect to some downed server half way accross the world and can’t access and play my single player games.

I can’t see any benefit to online requirements at all, maybe if you’re the type of person who travels or something, the ‘cloud’ save system might be of use to you. /Shrug

 

You missed the best part of his blog post.

“Yesterday reports that Adam Orth, the guy who somehow caused [the always online xbox shitstorm], is no longer at Microsoft.”

 
 

spoidar:

Good find, that article has a lot of great points. To me always online is code for software as a service. I hate that business model but that’s what it is, a business model and as long as its perceived as the most profitable that is what will happen.

Arguments about stable internet connections or not are a side issue.

 

vcatkiller:
I’d be with him if more of the world actually had a stable internet connection.

This and the fact that they’re forcing games to have use by dates for no reason at all. No one can say for sure but I very much doubt the servers for these online only games will be running forever.

 

awesome… so either he’s going to help subsidise my connection fees or help build the infrastructure so that we never notice any connection delays???

Kinda sad to see how thick of a bubble he’s come to live in these days. He’s spouting just as much nonsense as anyone from EA, or Activision.

 

exe3: No one can say for sure but I very much doubt the servers for these online only games will be running forever.

That is the EXACT thing they are secretly wanting to push for, why else would you want to do it.

 

i know not everyone can get internet n what not. But for a vast majority of us, we have an constant online connection, the issues with always online falls more on the developers side of fucking up (like sim city) lol

Its eventually going to be a given this always online shit, so we may as well get used too it :(

 

Maybe always on is the future, but the infrastructure isn’t there to get the support, Cliffy talks about Xbox Live only using Broadband, and you know what, barely anyone used it prior to Xbox360, but those who didn’t could still play Halo2 and Crimson Skies by themselves or with a friend in the same room.

I’m not a fan of Always Online, the servers are never on when I want to play (Diablo 3 i’m looking squarely at you) or can’t handle the load (Sim City, you still can’t go full speed?). ‘Occasionally’ online would be fine. I get that they want to stop the second hand market, but why not just register it to an account, you need to be connected to install your new game but then you can be offline to play it.
I don’t want a hiccup in the phone lines to boot me out of the SP game I’m playing, if I get a large lag spike because someone else in the house decided to watch some youtube, oh sorry, can’t finish that level.

 

The future comes when we all have cheap and fast internet, UNTIL THEN SCREW YOU!!! Trying support something right now but just referring to the future aren’t helping when they are pushing it NOW!!!! WHY DO IT NOW when it is for the FUTURE!!!!! They don’t have get ready for that crap, but we need to!!!
Sorry for so many caps lock but this message will never get to their thick but hollow heads.

 

*sigh*

Cliffy B is pretty much perpetuating the stereotype of Americans not caring about anything outside their own country with this rant.

 

While I’ve warmed to online distribution (sub $10 1yr old games = good), I will never be an advocate for always online gaming.

I love my Diablo 3… but not when there’s server maintenance, internet connection issues (storms, flood pits, aging routers, shared bandwidth, etc). My first battle against Diablo was ruined because my internet dropped out. A singleplayer game shouldn’t be affected like this. I like the fact that my character saves weren’t lost when my desktop PC died… but steam + Torchlight 2 does this too… and it has offline gaming.

IMHO, the demand for more bandwidth is artificially created by companies and encourages waste of good resources.

 
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