CCP want to make it so you “don’t need a degree in playing EVE Online” to play

EVE Online Learning Curve

By on December 7, 2012 at 12:02 pm

EVE Online is one of the most popular and truly free-form MMOs around — but that free-form nature comes at a price, as EVE is also one of the most difficult-to-get-into MMOs around.

CCP’s John Lander, Executive Producer on EVE, is aiming to change that. “I want to try and reduce that barrier of entry to playing EVE. I don’t ever want EVE to be nice and fluffy and it’s a wonderful place to be. I think there’s a place in the MMO world for a dark and dangerous, really good sci-fi world where you can be the goodie, the baddie, a criminal, the Good Samaritan. But it’s very important we allow as many people as possible to get access to that game.”

Lander was discussing the changes that CCP are planning to make to the game when upcoming expansion Retribution launches, including an overhauled interface, targeting, Crimewatch, and further unrevealed systems. “That’s just the first step in making it so you don’t need a degree in playing EVE Online to be able to play EVE Online,” said Lander.

“Retribution is a great foundation for what I’m calling the second decade of EVE,” he said. But, he added, “we don’t want to dumb our game down, we don’t want to make it easy.”

Source: Eurogamer

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5 comments (Leave your own)

Add a function called “n00b”.

Basically if its going to get you screwed up, you get a warning saying “this will screw you up right now, don’t do it!”.

some will listen, most wont xD

 

i love that photo

 

Best part about eve is you can play for 6 years and still have to ask someone how to do things, making it simpler would allow a much greater audience to play but would ruin that feeling. Not knowing how everything works is great. At least for me once I know everything there is in a game it’s not as fun.

 

gmf1:
Best part about eve is you can play for 6 years and still have to ask someone how to do things, making it simpler would allow a much greater audience to play but would ruin that feeling. Not knowing how everything works is great. At least for me once I know everything there is in a game it’s not as fun.

Except not knowing how thing’s work is a terrible business model, and people end up googling how to do certain things anyway instead of wasting months of time using trial and error.

I personally dislike the troll-status people take in the game; because it’s ‘accepted’ to be a prick people adopt their true personas in there.

 
James Pinnell

I’ve been playing Eve for a very long time, and the high barrier to entry is both a blessing and a curse.

It prevents significant amounts of morons staying inside for too long, meaning the large majority of players are largely intelligent. It also fosters an extraordinary amount of dedication on behalf of players.

However, the very high learning curve is arguably stemming growth and reduces players that are time light from being able to get into things quickly, nor does it do a good job of weaning people off traditional MMORPG tropes.

 
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