Games you should be playing: Tekkit

Minecraft Tekkit Mod

By on July 12, 2012 at 9:00 am

It seems more than likely that the majority of people, especially those who joined the fray back during its infancy, are probably pretty sick of vanilla Minecraft. Although its design reflects the creative nature of the person playing it, there’s only so many things you can build within the framework restrictions of the original version.

It’s disappointing that Notch and Mojang, once they had stripped out enough cash and kudos from the project, basically decided to abandon it to work on other titles, leaving just Jeb and a few who continue to support both the PC and X360 versions. Thus, as things usually are once the developers move on, modders have overwhelmingly filled the space that was once originally difficult to occupy.

Notch famously resisted the demands of those who he worried would corrupt and destabilize his creation, even when many avid developers were already hacking in unauthorized elements that required installing different clients or bypassing authentication servers. It wasn’t until Mojang eventually submitted to demand and added basic mod support (although a proper API is not due until 1.4) that a host of ambitious projects gradually worked their way into reality.

Most of these projects involved a host of quite drastic changes, ranging from fixing existing problems (such that those with rail or farming) to expanding the range of minerals, crafting materials and introducing automation. An industrial revolution of sorts began to appear across the most popular and well supported modifications, with a trend towards speed and less rudimentary tools, the development of electricity and the various ways in which it could be harnessed.

Before long, many of these mods had become stable elements within the original ecosystem, and revolutionized the way mining and production were done in Minecraft. But while each mod operated independently without any problems,  many found it difficult to run one or a few of them in conjunction, since they required different server properties, or simply shared properties that were incompatible with one another.

The solution? The Technic mod pack, a collection of various mods that have come together under the shared umbrella of a universal server infrastructure and collaborative resources. Uniting the various mod developers, alongside a keen team of volunteers and testers, allowed both the independent development of each mod to continue while making sure compatibility remains paramount. Tekkit, a spinoff project closely linked to Technic, is the multiplayer sibling, allowing players unrivaled creative freedom to harvest the bountiful randomized green lands with their friends. Additionally, unlike the obscenely broken original SMP version of Minecraft, almost every property from the new elevator rail to the new engine and power generation systems, works perfectly.

When I was originally invited by a friend into his new server, I admit that I was a little skeptical. Many variations on the original SMP experience had proved to be reasonably underwhelming, such as adding a few abilities to modify weather or time patterns, but largely keeping the original ethos intact. So I slid quickly into the same old groove, manually digging out stone and the odd mineral to build my house and upgrade my tools. Eventually, I wandered into the houses of my fellow inhabitants to find (and hear) the rumbling of engines, pistons and grinders. “This is what I’ve been telling you”, my friend mentioned as I marveled at his electric furnace, “Tekkit changes everything”.

He was right. As I followed him around his underground fortress, he showed me some of the creations he’d built over the past month or so. A fully functioning nuclear power plant, completely encased in a cube of water and coolant, a (currently) dormant but working core just waiting for some refined uranium to power it up. An array of machines to automate some of the most time consuming and mind numbing tasks, such as smelting iron or recycling dud waste like dirt or gravel.

But the most impressive, and exciting, part of his enterprise was the array of automated mining quarries he had deep beneath his home. There were about 4 of them, roughly 100×100 wide, buffeted by enormous scaffolding and a series of transport pipes that moved ore, stone, sand and such to a set of chests with filters to differentiate the good from the useless. 4 enormous lasers carved out the impressively large caverns, ripping apart the fertile planet until there was nothing left but lava and bedrock.

So how did all of this operate? I wandered up to the roof where I found a twisted flower-like structure consisting of solar panels, connected together by (and I’m not joking) fibre optic cable down to a transformer and a power storage unit. This unit operated as a high capacity battery, storing millions of generated EM (Tekkit’s measurement of electricity) as it was generated by day, allowing for work to be done at night.

All of this sounds impressive, and it is, but its barely scratching the surface of the various possibilities that are available. There’s even alchemy, energy manipulation and transference, and the ability to even create a fully automated factory (or multiple). The sheer scale of the industrial design on offer is immense, as it can take hours, if not days, to farm the necessary materials to build certain machines or craft particularly advanced items. But what makes it fun is being able to work on projects of extraordinary detail and complexity with your friends, putting together plans and pooling resources.

At its core, Tekkit is still Minecraft – there are still the same beasts to defend yourself from, food you need to eat, and armour you need to wear. But the choice on how you tackle these challenges has been greatly expanded, making the whole experience the one you might have imagined just after the game released. So feel free to raise cows and sheep next to your wind farm, or grow crops alongside your series of quarries that would make Clive Palmer weep with jealously. Just make sure you take some time to craft a jetpack.

Jump on games.on.net’s Tekkit server right now!

If you’ve already got Tekkit installed, connect to tekkit.games.on.net:6969. If you don’t have Tekkit installed, you can download Tekkit from here. Click here for all the server details.

For more information about our Tekkit server or just to talk Minecraft in general, why not visit our Minecraft forum?

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13 comments (Leave your own)

Wow. I played vanilla for days before I grew bored… looks like i’ll have to reinvest some time…. but with TSW here… arrgh!

 

You hit the nail right on the head within the first paragraph. This has sparked my interest in minecraft again! Very nice read :)

 

The half blocks and sliver blocks in RedPower2 make everything so pretty.

 

This looks pretty awesome although I imagine 1 person could take up some major space in SMP.
I wonder if they need to introduce multiple spawn points so that it doesn’t get so crowded.

 
James Pinnell

flabcab,

The server admin will usually make an area around the spawn protected so people don’t build a quarry on it :)

Generally the ideal situation in Tekkit is to put a reasonably wide berth between housing, so you don’t cross swords when it comes to mining.

 

Been playing Technic mod pack since about Beta 1.8 but owing to various things like world corruption from the power cutting out and other such events never got towards some of the more fun stuff towards the end of technic. Also I’ve havn’t gone over to the SMP side of it yet, perhaps I’ll peruse over to the GON tekkit server one day.

 

James Pinnell,

So I guess the idea is to spawn go walking in a direction for a while and then start building.

You would still get the large majority of construction around spawn with lots of people bunched togerther.

 

Awesome :D

This is also a test ;)

 

Tekkit is indeed awesome.
BUT there are a few items of misinformation that I feel need pointing out. I don’t mean to detract from the mod itself, because there is some really awesome stuff in there and I look forward to further improvements.

- However you feel about vanilla minecraft and Notch, I was under the impression there are currently more people working on it than ever before.

- I think you mean EU (Energy Unit) rather than EM. EU is the unit of energy used by Industrial Craft, which is the the mod that adds much of the complex machinery. Each mod uses its own power system, and they are generally incompatible.

- There are tons of bugs in these mods, even before considering the interactions between them. The jetpack will kill you if you aren’t very very careful, due to the way falling damage is calculated. The Equivalent Exchange armour doesn’t protect you from fall damage in the nether. The elevator rail used to kill you slowly when you got near it. Equivalent Exchange items don’t always work. Hooking up a buildcraft wooden pipe to some of the equivalent exchange machinery will corrupt the entire chunk.

 

“It’s disappointing that Notch and Mojang, once they had stripped out enough cash and kudos from the project, basically decided to abandon it to work on other titles”

Wow, way to throw away any shred of journalistic integrity in just the second paragraph. Author’s opinions are usually reserved for the final notes.

 
James Pinnell

enduwolf:

Wow, way to throw away any shred of journalistic integrity in just the second paragraph. Author’s opinions are usually reserved for the final notes.

It’s not a news article, it’s a feature based on my experiences with the mod. Like a review, there will obviously be elements of my thoughts and opinions thrown in.

frankyg,

Thanks for the correction mate :)

 

James Pinnell: It’s not a news article, it’s a feature based on my experiences with the mod. Like a review, there will obviously be elements of my thoughts and opinions thrown in.

I don’t want to start an argument (rare on the internet I know) but a feature article is still an article – a report, not an opinion piece. The language you used was bordering on defamatory, otherwise I would have just blown it off.

I’m impressed by your response time though. Kudos.

 
James Pinnell

enduwolf: I don’t want to start an argument (rare on the internet I know) but a feature article is still an article – a report, not an opinion piece. The language you used was bordering on defamatory, otherwise I would have just blown it off.

I’m impressed by your response time though. Kudos.

We’ll agree to disagree then :)

I live to please.

 
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